Tag Archives: Ayrton Senna

Would you like a side order of broken fan-belt with your lunch, sir?

Two weeks and counting to Copperstate 2017, and this year’s rally feels less like a well-oiled machine and more like a re-enactment of the Titanic.  To say the last few weeks have been interesting, would be a perfect example of English understatement; and to be fair, dear reader, will make little sense if I don’t turn the clock back to 2015.

Two years ago, this particular Copperstate lunch was supposed to be nothing more than very tasty and rather uneventful, somewhere in the backwaters of Northern Arizona.  I was enjoying varied conversation with fantastic gearheads, whilst my navigationally challenged cousin was being introduced to the joys of technology and the infamous Bring A Trailer website.

And then it happened…. before I could even reach over to pick up the milk for my coffee, said relative had reached into his pocket, found and dialed a phone number and announced triumphantly to some random person at the end of his phone, “well, I think we have a deal!”.  The entire table went quiet as we all turned to look at the deliverer of this pronouncement, and my heart missed a beat.Instead of the usually mild mannered face I’ve become used to seeing asleep in the passenger seat, I was presented with the classic symptoms of ‘Buy Now, Think Later’.  Slightly myopic grin, mixed with the unmistakable red mist in the eyes that only comes from that first-time adrenaline rush of successfully bidding, sight unseen, on something one REALLY doesn’t need.

crazy face

I frantically looked at the rest of our table, hoping I was wrong; but their combined expressions of abject horror confirmed my greatest fear.  A long, uncomfortable pause followed by closing and re-opening my eyes didn’t produce better results.  Nothing else for it, but be strong and look at the iPad to answer the question I did not want to ask. I gripped the table, glanced down, and there, staring defiantly back at me, in all its rumpled, orange glory, was the culprit.  One decidedly aging, non-running Jensen Interceptor Mark II.

Having finally snapped out of his dubious purchase love-bubble, H immediately sprang into action; explaining we must leave immediately, so he could complete the transaction.  Clearly this item was far more popular than I realized, if there was an actual possibility it would be snapped up by another equally optimistic individual before we could complete the rest of our day.  So, as our rally buddies headed for Jerome to experience my favorite section of road in the entire state, we drove through a collection of no-horse towns to find something that resembled a real bank, rather than just ATM’s in liquor stores.

By the time we returned to base that evening (having probably covered more miles that day than most would be enjoying all week), said transaction was complete and Harry had the entire plan mapped out…. ending in our return in 2016 & the great unveiling of his new acquisition (it even included balloons and a marching band).

The only upside I could see, was insisting we show up in period costume. 1971 will never be remembered as a high spot for men’s fashion, but the idea of seeing him in polyester slacks and stick-on mutton chop side burns, as I insisted we listen to the Greatest Hits of The Osmonds on 8-Track, was quietly appealing.

70s fashion

 

 

 

 

 

 

So, why are we now desperately trying to find a lifeboat before the iceberg reaches us?  After all, as Harry pointed out, he (translation we, or more likely, me) had a year to complete the task of Jensen resurrection & that date was reached 12 months ago.

Because, as everyone knows…you take the time expected for said project, double it, add the age of your first pet hamster at its sad demise and maybe, if you’re lucky….really lucky……

Fast forward to 2016 Copperstate and the Trusty Egg performed in all her bulletproof glory.  The subject of the Jensen a regular discussion over breakfast, lunch & dinner; with a combination of commiseration “aah, English electrics, what could possibly go right?”, confusion “wouldn’t it have been cheaper to buy one already finished?” or fascination “he lives in England and decided to buy a car in America, but not ship it home?”.  Harry added to the excitement by buying a gas barbecue in Phoenix and then taking it, boxed,on the entire rally, leading to the mistaken four-day assumption we had the final piece to complete the car, and it was only a matter of hours before Orangina would appear.

And so, moving swiftly along, we come to Copperstate 2017.  More than reasonable progress has been made with the Jensen, but my practical nature ensured the smart money was on my application going in with The Egg as car number one, and Orangina as the back-up.  Lady Luck decided to smile again, and confirmation arrived in early February that we’d made the cut once more.  As this event continues to grow in popularity, and receives unanimous praise whenever featured in articles, I consider our repeat inclusion to be a real compliment.  And so, Egg preparation began in earnest.

Opportunities to get out and drive included a fantastic run with the LA Porsche Club last month, that took us up to Ventura and back down to Malibu for an early morning boost, and ensured we easily crossed the threshold of ‘300 miles in 3 months’ requirement.  A comprehensive list of possible issues to be checked by the Egg Doctor was made before booking her in for the mechanical inspection, as well as the decision to switch out tyres this year to the Classic Porsche range from Pirelli (reviews are extremely favorable, and they look great!!)

All was good in my world.  Enough time to balance a hectic work schedule without additional stress, all signs pointing to go with the car. What could possibly go wrong?  Until an email arrived; containing one seemingly innocuous question….

Tune in next week for the next episode 😉

 

 

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Really, I can’t make this stuff up

With The Egg happily packed in its carton and heading to AZ by yesterday lunchtime, I didn’t have much reason to update my blog before kick-off.  Until, that is, hapless cousin arrived; and bought with him yet more internet gold.

Returning home last night I found his trousers on the driveway, iPad on the deck and an otherwise quiet house.  Confused, I checked the garden shed (usual location for most lost Englishmen), but still no luck.  As I reached for my cellphone, he bumbled into the kitchen, munching his way through a bag of crisps (US translation: chips) and proceeded to share his woeful tale of a lost iPhone.  However, before you hit the “oh no” button, dear reader; I have to mention this is actually a replay of a conversation we had when he visited a couple of years ago.

My perfectly pre-ordered super shuttle picked him up and deposited him to the final destination. Unfortunately, the excitement to actually experience sunshine first hand was so great, he didn’t notice his phone sitting on the seat as he climbed out.  Desperate to change into shorts and a dubious ensemble of purple socks and checked shirt (clearly doesn’t pay any attention to the Instagram reposts of great menswear looks I share with the world), his entire focus was Vitamin D.

The only glimmer of hope on the horizon was Apple’s genius development of GPS & synching.  Forlornly he stared at the iPad, now taunting him with confirmation said phone was sitting somewhere in Glendale, as I called customer service to explain “our” predicament.  One extremely helpful lady, later, and we had reassurance they’d do everything possible to reach the driver and make arrangements for a later return.

Jetlag provided Harry with an early morning start, and he was horrified to realise the phone had managed a round trip to both Burbank and LAX airport before 6:30am.  With a quick nod of thanks to Apple, he used another apparently useful feature and made the thing start beeping as loudly as possible.

Which is why my morning started at 6:37am, with a call from a complete stranger, informing me had my phone.  An interesting statement as I’d grumpily answered the thing 5 seconds earlier until he explained there was a message flashing to inform it was lost and who to contact.  An electronic version of Paddington’s label, really.

The Rally Gods were fortunately smiling on us as man, phone and super shuttle were literally (if the iPad GPS was to be trusted) now less than a mile away en route to their next pick-up before heading back to LAX.  I reassured the very nice voice at the end of my phone, we could be wherever they were in under 4 minutes, if only they would wait.

Which is why by 6:45am, I was driving through my neighbourhood in my PJ’s.  In no mood for red lights before my first coffee, I opted for a couple of quick U-turns and reached our destination with almost 30 seconds to spare.

Back home, coffee in progress, and dearest cousin Harry mentions he’d travelled to Atlanta in February, and had managed to do the exact same thing AGAIN before returning to London.

Before I could deafen him with my silence, he smilingly pointed out, “look on the bright side; we’ve already had a quick practice run of dodgy navigation requires quick driving reflexes, just before this year’s event”

…..Remind me again, what would we do without family?!!

paddington

Good grief, is that the time? I’ve been gone for ages!!

I’m not the world’s worst blogger, but after seeing how long it’s been since my last post, I may deserve the title of “World’s Second Worst Blogger”

It’s not that I don’t enjoy this pastime, the complete opposite is actually true….I just feel obligated to have something exciting to report to my three regular readers (Auntie Colleen, the Cat and some very nice person in the Los Feliz area) to warrant their ongoing support.

It would be so much easier if he'd be a back seat driver.

It would be so much easier if he was a back seat driver.

Fortunately they are in luck (although with said cat staring at the computer as I type, there is additional pressure to make this entry both interesting and typo free (extremely difficult when feline’s head seems to be constantly moving in time to the Stereophonics track playing in the background), as the automotive updates are considerable.

In no particular order –

Copperstate 2015.  We’re in!! Again!!  Woohoo, I AM Penelope Pitstop!!!  Navigationally challenged cousin has already booked his flight from England and I’m considering purchasing socks with L & R stitched into them to help with this year’s map reading.  Or, glue the map book to my arm in a slightly McGuyver fashion whilst he recounts stories of all the really interesting things he can see out of the window that are totally irrelevant to our journey.  Better still, it’s 25th anniversary for the event, so an extra driving day has been added.  What more could a girl ask for?!

Talking of anniversaries –  The Egg and I hit a pretty impressive milestone in the past few months, as we’re both 50.  I know this to be true as I treated her to a certificate of authenticity last year, and I had a big party this past January.  Happy to report that other than minor modifications for each of us (she’s been painted a couple of times since new, I now consider the hair salon a necessity rather than an option), we’re both essentially factory originals.  Can’t help feeling the gap will start to widen in her favour over the next few years, but c’est la vie!

Badger hats?  Just call me an early adopter ;)

Badger hats? Just call me an early adopter 😉

Following Copperstate 2014, I planned to start fixing some of the more cosmetic issues (after all, we are – sorry, SHE IS 50).  Fortunately our Egg Doctor decided to check her in case any other problems may have appeared following the 1000 miles we added to the engine.  After a thorough examination he subsequently made an executive decision to replace the kingpins, due to concern there was just a little too much play as we took the corners.  Knowing enough to appreciate the importance of a round hole versus an oval where this particular car part is concerned, I was only too happy to support the plan.  Once I had the keys back, I was completely overjoyed….because, I love The Egg; and have forced my closer friends to suffer the song I wrote to celebrate this particular fact.

It’s a simple song, consisting of that one line repeated over and over, at the top of my voice with no discernible note in tune and clearly I should not be giving up my day job anytime soon.  On the drive back from Torrence, I not only sang this catchy little number, but had added enough choruses to justify a 12″ extended remix with possibly a second version from Mark Ronson chucked in for good measure…the difference was INCREDIBLE.

Faster, more responsive, no slight wandering irrespective of speed or road surface, she now glides round the corners better than I could ever have imagined.  It’s as if I have my own Outlaw – a brand new car in a vintage body.  The Egg Doctor assured me she was now bullet proof, and with every additional mile I’ve added since; he’s been proven 110% correct.  The only thing stopping me from considering more road trips is finding people to join me, as this car is unstoppable!!!

Additional highlights of  the past few months also included a couple of fantastic driving events by the most exciting addition to the automotive magazine world; Petrolicious.  If you are not familiar, please check them out at http://www.petrolicious.com – as the variety of articles, information and fabulous car photos are superb.  Better still, they not only like to write about driving, they’re happy to organize it for the rest of us!  I’ll expand on both events in future posts, but in the meantime – please give them some support.

Maximus Felines is now sitting asleep next to me, so I’m tentatively hopeful he considers my return to the digital age worthwhile. Auntie Colleen is currently asleep in England (& ” you know how much I hate those computer things, so don’t forget to post me a copy”), so thanks in advance my dear Los Feliz reader and I hope this made you smile.

 

Tortoise and the Hare

Wednesday arrived, and with it the final leg of the 1000 miles of this year’s Copperstate.  We had almost made it out of the hotel car park before the mechanical cousin realized he’d left his cell phone happily charging in the breakfast room.  Fortunately I have excellent turning and reversing skills, so we returned, retrieved…and headed off again.

Through Sedona, only to be met with extremely bad traffic.  Living in LA, this is not an unusual experience; unfortunately we soon discovered the cause was not regular congestion, but an accident involving one of the Copperstate Highway Patrol.   All emergency services had come out to help one of their own, a reassuring but still worrying sight.  We later discovered what had happened – turning into a forecourt to check on another entrant, the Patrol officer was hit by a driver who decided to pull straight into traffic without stopping to look first.  There was no time to take any avoiding action, and serious injuries were sustained. A situation I’ll revisit later.

Our ultimate destination was Scottsdale, and the morning route took us out to and through Prescott, and with it more stunning scenery, charming old towns and happy waving people as we drove through.  The weather couldn’t have been better if we’d special ordered it.  Moderate temperatures meant the Egg’s “two windows down” air conditioner was all we needed, as we meandered along small single track roads with only other Copperstaters for company.  It was difficult to believe we’d already covered almost 800 miles in a 49 year old car, she was literally singing like Maria as we cornered every bend; and everything about the performance continued to improve the further we drove.  We kept pushing the distance between gas stops, for no other reason than she was running more and more efficiently; maintaining a speed of anything from 65 – 80 mph was simple, because that’s where the car wanted to be.  “She’ll be bulletproof”, the Egg Doctor  told me, and he was absolutely correct!

The last stretch of the morning took us up and down and through switchbacks coming into Bagdad.  As this section had been included last year, I was delighted to see it again, and just as happy to let my mechanical cousin drive, and enjoy watching him enjoy the experience.  He smiles a great deal anyway, but by the time we reached our lunch spot, I was sharing the car with a human equivalent of the Cheshire Cat.  Good times.

There are some great cars, and some really great drivers on this event. One of which was a professional Porsche racing instructor/racer; who very generously offered to let Harry ride shotgun for the afternoon in his exquisite Jaguar XK150 OTS.  The remainder of the route was easy enough for me to navigate and drive, so I reassured him that I’d be fine.  He left, I continued chatting with friends…but there was just something that didn’t feel quite right.  Sipping coffee, I replayed the late morning….switchbacks, happy cousin, pull into car park, get out of passenger seat…happy cousin locks car and we walk into restaurant…happy cousin has my car keys.  Happy cousin has gone!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

In less time than it takes to shout “get out of my way”; I left my seat, sprinted (much to my amazement, had absolutely no idea I could move that fast) and found the Jag literally about to disappear into the wild blue yonder.  One “oops” later from the family member, before they disappeared in a roar of engine, and normal service was resumed.

The final leg from Bagdad to Scottsdale was a great combination of open scenery that stretched for low desert miles in either direction, with occasional bursts of small towns.  At one point it was just me and the Egg, cruising happily along a route that was so quiet, I wondered if maybe I’d accidentally taken a wrong turning and stumbled into somewhere the world had forgotten about.  Time has a different meaning in this situation.  No radio, no need or desire to be glued to some electronic device, a watch that I inevitably forget to wind most mornings…all I could do was just enjoy the moment and the environment.  Through Wickenberg, every speed limit was fastidiously observed – as the local constabulary had politely alerted us that any decision not to do that would be dealt with appropriately.  The Copperstate isn’t a race, it’s a rally – but when you’re presented with perfect driving conditions, and long inviting roads, it’s easy to forget that there are limits we’re expected to maintain!

One final section before reaching the outskirts of Scottsdale included another change of scenery; driving through Peoria and the tall pines were back. A few miles that reminded me again of Europe, before coming back into the early afternoon heat and sunshine that everyone associates with AZ.  I pulled into the car park, and was quickly amused to discover that I’d beaten the XK150….which explained the stationary flash of red I’d spotted on the way out of Wickenberg!!  My tortoise to their hare, clearly benefitting from the classic F1 move of the when to fuel.  How often it all comes down to time spent (or not) in the pits 🙂

524296_10151635859193968_1057976741_n 17186_10151637117253968_153942734_n

 

The dictionary definition of awesome should simply be, “The Grand Canyon”.

Snowy conditions……my favourite!  That news greeted us over the coffee and croissants for Tuesday’s breakfast, and presented a few more options for all of us than initially expected.  Our route was to take us up to an elevation of at least 8000 feet, so the weather change shouldn’t be ignored.   A quiet review of road conditions with the mechanical cousin, based on the theory:

  • We had The Egg (German engineering)
  • All weather tyres (rain and snow no issue), and
  •  Two drivers born in England (bad weather is synonymous with our cultural identity)

Left us flipping a coin and deciding we’d chance our luck until it ran out, and take the original mapped route.

Heading through Flagstaff, we seemed to be driving for an awfully long time with nothing listed in the route book, showing up on our horizon.  With no visible landmarks, there seemed to be only one option – good old Google maps.  Unfortunately, that didn’t seem to offer the immediately expected result, so I decided that old school was the last resort.  We pulled into a garage forecourt, and I headed inside with the route book and was happy to discover that we had done nothing more than overshoot a turning about four miles earlier.

At this point, I should also mention that my mechanical cousin is many things….all good….but keen navigator is not one of them.  It’s not that he can’t navigate, he just occasionally forgets.  Not a serious problem, but certainly added a level of excitement throughout our entire trip.  By the time we retraced our steps and found the right track, we’d eaten up about an hour and better still, given the sun enough time to start drying out the road.

And what a road…..forty plus miles of gently undulating curves that took us up and over a mountain pass.  Tall pines and the occasional deer our only companions as we headed through some of the most desolately beautiful countryside of the entire rally.  Our plan paid off, as we made it all the way to the lunchtime stop, an airplane museum in Valle.  Now on the other side of a mountain, weather conditions had changed from cold and snowy to just as cold  wind, a not completely welcome change.  Lunch was a welcome break before heading off to our next exploration, the big ditch.

I’ve lived in Los Angeles for eighteen years, and am embarrassed to admit that I have not seen the Grand Canyon.  Many trips to Las Vegas, and yet there never seemed to be the time or inclination to add it to the itinerary.  Having seen so many photographs, there’s a sense of familiarity which may be the reason….but all of that changed on Tuesday afternoon as we paraded through the Grand Canyon National Park.

Stopping at the first recommended viewing point, I finally managed to see it with my own eyes, and the only word I could come up with seemed to be “wow”; which obviously falls short of any real description, but if you’ve seen what the locals affectionately call ‘The Big Ditch’, you will understand.  Photo opportunities were perfect as we reached our destination early enough in the afternoon for the combination of sun and shadow to play across this natural wonder.

Our cruise back to Sedona continued the slightly alpine theme, from the vegetation at least.  The last few miles coming back into the valley was breathtaking…..the  layers of red sandstone forming beautiful rocks that are so unusual it’s tempting to expect Tim Burton’s Martians to be hiding in crevices.  Or maybe I’ve been living in LA too long!!!

Story swapping back at base was a mixed affair.  Those who opted for the alternative route were either relieved or disappointed to find out what we experienced.  After all, being in a convertible when the top almost works is not really conducive to winter climates. For a few others, the realization that if The Egg could do it, so should they was a little more bittersweet.  Best news, no real casualties either way; which is all that everyone hopes for by the time cocktail hour arrives.

 

Snow Egg - she looks good at every angle!
Snow Egg – she looks good at every angle!
Yes...there really is snow in the desert!

Yes…there really is snow in the desert!

A very big ditch

A very big ditch

Happy family

Happy family

It’s an “Egg Carton”, dear….

T minus 23 hours before we reach Phoenix….the seven day weather forecast for parts of the state as I know we’re visiting promises perfect driving conditions…..not much else to share at this point, other than my favourite shot of the Egg this week:team3

 

If it was that simple, I guess everyone would be doing it….

The phrase “heel & toe” has been floating around all afternoon, so I headed off to Youtube to seek out inspiration.  Fortunately I found it, in this great example………

Of course I know what I’m doing??!

I’m a great believer in asking the experts, so I’ve sent a few emails out to men with far greater driving skill and expertise than I’ll ever manage to acquire.  The responses so far have added to the enthusiasm and slight concern about our upcoming adventure!

Steve Wheeler, ex-racer, car enthusiast & jolly good chap started the ball rolling………”I suggest be gentle on your little egg at first, until you both become acclimatised to the new regime, let the tyres and brakes ‘scrub in’, be easy on her, always (ALWAYS) change gear like you’re going to Sainsbury’s!   If your pedal setup allows it, practise heel & toe on change down, to save both Gearbox and engine stress and avoid locking the rear brakes (If they’re good enough to lock!).

At the end of the first couple of stages, gauge your pace against those in your class, or those against whom you feel the need to compete / BEAT! Then adjust your pace from there, not all of your competitors will finish… and as you know ‘to finish first, first you have to finish’!”

Alain de Cadenet – Alfa aficionado, Vintage car enthusiast & Le Mans racer generouslyoffered the following comments………….”Such a good idea for you to be doing all this; perfect car too.  Make sure your people change out your brake fluid for fresh before you go. It’s hygroscopic and can be nasty when it gets hot if it’s old; bit like us too!

I only run a 165 section tyre myself with a 1720cc big bore engine.  Have good run on your 195’s to feel the steering isn’t too heavy etc. The folk on the run are a good lot and not in the least intimidating.  Also, take plenty of water in the car as it gets bloody hot out there!!!  Maybe a quart or two of whatever oil they put in too. I run Pennzoil 20/50 that Dave’s Lube uses. You might seek a GPS on board just in case your co-pilot gets you lost.”

So – on the plus side, I have the right vehicle.  On the slightly more negative……I have absolutely no idea how to heel/toe, need to be thinking about avoiding shopping carts every time I gear change, anticipate recurring nightmares of us lost amongst the tumbleweeds desperately looking for cell-phone coverage as the desert sun beats down & feel duty bound not to let these guys down by coming last.

No pressure there, then!!!

Remembering someone special…

Life in California for the past 17 years has included some great experiences, places and people.  At the top of the list of people continues to be someone I was lucky enough to call friend, and he was kind enough to refer to me as “The Tea Lady”….a wonderful man called Bud Ekins.  Bud was and still is a legendary figure – a great motorcycle racer, the stunt man responsible for the Great Escape jump and a wonderful raconteur.  Until you were accepted into the inner circle, his ability to completely ignore was almost as impactful as the classic one-liner putdowns.  But once he’d decided to grant membership; the opportunity to just spend a few hours listening to stories, re-visiting old races with him, or just hang out quietly…..they were all such special opportunities.

My first meeting was intimidating to say the least.  The Saturday crowd (a collection of old racers, friends and gear-heads) had already assembled at his workshop.  Bud was holding court; sitting on his bar stool, occasionally waving his finger and chain-smoking unfiltered Gauloises (he raced in France during the 50’s, and came back with the name Chanticleer & penchant for their cigarettes); with an incredible collection of early teen motorcycles and automobiles as the backdrop to his tales.

Clearly an outsider due my gender & lack of motorcycle knowledge,  I hung back to let my then husband talk all things Triumph with him, for a while.  The sign above his pool table “Women Keep Out”, was pretty self-explanatory; so I just listened. Bud was electric, and the audience ADORED him.  It’s a strange phenomenon, to see grown men in the presence of their real life hero………….

A few visits later, I warranted a smile or two; and then one day the world changed completely.  Bud and the ex were heading  to a motorcycle related something, and happened to be also dropping something off to me at the office.  Walking away from the car, I turned back to wave goodbye – and received one in return from Mr. Ekins.  It was a magical experience & from that day on, & I was part of the team.  A slightly different membership category, as my racing stories were limited at best.  So instead we would talk about his racing days in East Anglia, memories of travelling with his wife Betty when they first married, endless excursions to Ireland for his participation in an annual motorcycle rally…and anything else that just went “quite nicely, thank you” with a cup of tea.  The pool table wasn’t used much when we first visited, so I persuaded Bud to teach me.  A born winner, and highly competitive; he was still happy to tolerate my endless appalling attempts at scoring anything when we played – simply because I think it always amused him that I refused to accept that I really wasn’t very good.

Over the following ten years, I grew to know and love this old curmudgeon dearly. We were lucky enough to go to motorcycle auctions, racing events, car and bike shows with him.  The number of fans that he had never diminished, in fact with each passing year the affection and respect seemed to deepen.

Our friendship seemed to percolate from the routine of tea with milk in the yellow cup, and he would make many visitors wait for my to show up with it before he’d pay them any attention.   It wasn’t hard to spend hours listening to his stories, as they always came with an affectionate twinkle in his eye; but even more importantly I came to understand that Bud was a great man to have in your corner.  He loved women, in a “they’re tough, really are the stronger sex, can do anything” way.  He never doubted my ability, even when I was faced with situations that didn’t seem so easy.

Unfortunately Bud’s health deteriorated, as his body started to pay for all those years of riding, racing or occasionally throwing himself off a bike in the name of a great movie moment and; so towards the end our visits were to his home more often than anywhere else.  The routine stayed relatively simple – ordering fish & chips from “Pizza Man” (because he delivers!!), whilst I was in charge of pouring his whiskey (2 fingers, easy ice) and we just spent evenings talking about nothing in particular. It was more about the opportunity to be with a man I had certainly come to consider more like of father than even a friend.

And then in 2007, we lost Bud.  For all of us that knew and loved him it was, & still is, a void that can never be filled.  I managed to see him one last time in hospital, and I’m so grateful that I had the opportunity to tell him how important his support. understanding and friendship had been.

To celebrate the man,  his life and the legend, a memorial service was held at Warner Brothers lot on 2nd December.  I’m not sure what the studio expected, but it  was a truly incredible day.  More than 750 people showed up to pay their respects one last time, and remember this great man.  Assorted stories were told by racing legends and automotive aficionados, but the moment that bought us all to tears was hearing Donna & Suzie (Bud’s daughters) recount the alphabet the way Daddy had taught it….from Aprilia to Zundapp.

For me, there are some great memories, some special moments and then of course the tag line he gave me, that still makes me blush and smile….”It’s the tea lady.  I like to see her come, but I love to see her go”!!!!

(For more information about Bud’s racing history, go to http://www.budanddaveekins.com)

Countdown begins….!

Friday Feb 3rd…..email arrived, confirming that I’d been accepted for the 2012 Copperstate 1000.  I am soooooo excited, in a couple of months, the Egg and 75 of her newest best friends will be tearing around the scenic roads of Arizona!

Immediate flurry of activity, as the car & mechanical inspection list were dropped over to TRE.  Delivered her with my own list of small concerns – passenger seatbelt less than auto-rewinding, constant hot air (eventually) coming into the cockpit which seems to be more than just heater operator error, gears a little sloppy – but hopefully no signs of anything we should have to worry about.

By following mid-week, first question from the garage…..do we replace the tyres or keep fingers crossed that enough tread on 6 year olds will suffice?  Quick conflab with my oracle for all things, and new tyres were decided upon.  Initial decision may have been easy, but the selection process immediately turned into something slightly more intimidating.  As the car already has ’71 Fuchs wheels on her, with 185/65-15 originality wasn’t a requirement and it seems likely from previous event year’s routes that we could be experiencing a variety of different driving conditions…plus I wanted her to feel at least a little racerish (current set are not the most exciting round a corner)!  TRE threw out the idea of full blown racing tires as a second set…but with a garage already full of stuff I’ll probably never use, I decided to use a more unscientific approach to my tyre investigations…

  • How appealing is the tread pattern?
  • What are the reviews like for handling?

Happy that the combination of both points would come up with a variety of options, I started by looking at tread patterns (because aesthetics count for plenty in my world, shallow as that may seem) & then looked at user feedback on a variety of sites.  Growing up watching Formula One with my mother dictated that Michelin, Dunlop & Bridgestone were automatically included in the selection process, but after a couple of hours I settled on something completely different; 195/60-15 Kumho Ecsta ASX (ASX for All-Season Xtreme).

By week two, the tyres were delivered, brake master cylinder & heater valve replaced, new passenger seatbelt ordered, bracket for the battery (used one from a later model 911) installed, fire extinguisher fastened, TRE Dave was organising my tool kit & I’d been trying to work out exactly how easy a Le Mans style start is going to be…….!